Allegory of the Cave, And Socrates Teaching Number

Allegoryof the Cave, And Socrates Teaching

Number:

Allegoryof the Cave, and Socrates Teaching

Presentedby Plato, the famous Greek philosopher, ‘The Allegory of the Cave’also known as Plato’s Cave was used by the philosopher to comparethe impact of education, and lack of it on peoples nature. ThePlato’s cave was derived from a teaching by Socrates to his studentusing a metaphor. This metaphor was directed to illustrate the impactof education on humanity. This paper explains the ‘Plato`sallegory of the cave’ as well as relating this to his epistemology,and political view.

TheAllegory of the Cave summary,

Accordingto the metaphor, people are held in a dark cave where they aren’tsupposed to see even their sideways, or see their behind. They arechained to a wall and can only look straight ahead. However, behindthem there is a fire, with some statues in front of the fire suchthat, they cast their shadows on the wall the people in the cave arefacing. As the shadows are the only things the prisoners can see,they believe they are the real things in the world, and theirslightest imagination is based on the shadow. This is described asthe lowest level of imagination according to Socrates. However, whena prisoner is freed from the chains and allowed to look back and facethe fire, he realizes that, the shadows are no longer real, butshadows of the real. This stage is described as a belief. Theprisoner is later taken outside the cave, into the outside world, andrealizes the statues are copies of more real things, and this calledthe cognitive stage, which is later followed by understanding stageafter the prisoner realizes the sun is a representation of a ‘formof good’. The ultimate goal of education is to take every man asfar as possible from the cave, and should be intended to drive peopletowards the right desires. When person departures from the cave, heis enlightened, and is free from imprisonment, when he returns to thecave, he becomes blind again. However, it should be the nature of thepeople who are enlightened or gets outside the cave to enlightentheir counterparts.

Therecovering process of our knowledge of the forms is illustrated inthe allegory of the cave, with reface to the case, the chainedprisoner reflects the ordinary person and he regards the materialworld as the real world, this is before the person collects theknowledge of the forms. Shadows represent material objects, thedifficult ascent represents the knowledge of forms recollectionprocess, outside the cave, the objects represents different forms,and the sun is taken as the ‘form of good’.

Theallegory is somewhat related to the Theory of Forms by Plato, wherebythe forms/ideas according to Plato holds the key and the highest kindof reality, unlike the material world that is experienced throughsensation. With reference to the Plato’s Theory Of Forms, he statesthat, reality exists in two forms the world of sights and soundsthat is visible and the one that people inhabit, the second one isthe intelligent world of ideas/forms which is believed to stand abovethe visible world and in turn giving it being. It is only theknowledge of the forms that makes the real knowledge which isreferred by Socrates as ‘the good’. One of the Plato’s‘phaedo’, it contains a similar imagery to that of the allegoryof the cave, which explains a philosopher’s soul as a veritableprisoner within his body before gaining the philosophical knowledge.

Therehas been different approach towards the understanding of the allegoryof the cave metaphor. This has been either looked from anepistemological point of view, which is a reflection of Plato’sunderstanding of how people comes to know and understand things, orviewing this from a political lens. According to Plato differentaspects would make one an ideal leader in the society. Plato’sleadership lessons were very influenced in determining the correct orthe perfect leader in a society. Self-knowledge together with checkedego is some of the qualities. The leaders also need to be ambitious,as without it people would be driven to leave a legacy, which wouldimpact people for years. Moreover, a leader needs to possess ahealthy dose of humility, and in turn making one an open mindedleader, hence he will be able to make decisions that are of benefitto the majority and not just to preserve his own power.

Epistemologyis a branch of philosophy that entails study of evidence andknowledge. ` According to Plato, people can have genuine knowledgeonly for things that are unchanging and perfect. People can haveknowledge about the forms and not the material objects. Plato’sallegory of the cave illustrates the process of recovering ofknowledge. Through his epistemological arguments, Plato distinguishesbetween knowledge and opinion. Opinion is changeable, while knowledgeendures. In addition, knowledge is always true and is a result ofinstructions on the other hand opinion can either be true or falseand comes as a result of persuasion.

Therecovering process of our knowledge of the forms is illustrated inthe allegory of the cave, with reface to the case, the chainedprisoner reflects the ordinary person and he regards the materialworld as the real world, this is before the person collects theknowledge of the forms. Shadows represent material objects, thedifficult ascent represents the knowledge of forms recollectionprocess, outside the cave, the objects represents different forms,and the sun is taken as the ‘form of good’.

Examinationsaccording to Socrates are mean to make a good human life. He arguesthat, examination springs along the urge to learn and in turn leadingto acquiring of the desired knowledge. Socrates argued thatexamination helps in creating the desire to understand the forms orthe ideas of humanity and the world surrounding him, as it entailsserious reflection. This in turn is different compared to a good lifefor animals. The allegory of the cave formed the basis explanationand relation to the Plato’s theory of form. In addition, Allegoryof the Cave also is important in Plato’s Epistemology explanation.