Analysis of Articles Article 1

Analysisof Articles

Article1:

MorrisonJ.L. &amp Hodgkina, B. J. (1971). The effectiveness of Catholiceducation: A comparative analysis. Sociologyof education, 44(1), 119-131.

Theauthors of TheEffectiveness of Catholic Educationarticle tries to find out how effective catholic education is incomparison with public schools. This is in response to variousinconsistencies in other researches. Some claim that catholiceducation is more effective than public schools. On the other hand,some researchers stipulate that catholic schools are no differentfrom public schools counterparts with regard to academic performance.The inconsistence prompted a research on the effectiveness ofcatholic schools to provide a more profound answer.

Theauthor denotes that catholic schools systems are complex anddifferent from public schools counterparts. This difference hasattracted many scholars who feel that the education of catholic mightbe more effective than that of public schools. The authors also notethat in the modern world, catholic schools have changed to embracethe complexities of the contemporary society while at the same timeimposing religious charisma.

Theauthors conducted a research by utilizing the statistics in the USBureau of Census alongside questionnaires that were mailed toschools. Using the estimates of the study, it is prevalent thatcatholic schools tend to perform than pub better public schools. Thisdifference is attributed to the fact that catholic school admits moreacademically capable children hence, more likely to achieve better.In addition, students in catholic schools have an added advantage ofsocial class composition. Many come from stable families with a highpercentage of their fathers having a white collar job.

Apparently,the article explicitly explains how and why catholic schools and moreeffective. The effectiveness of catholic schools education isattributed to its form of selection and social class composition asopposed to the education system. Selecting children with higher IQhas an added advantage with regard to academic achievement.Additionally, social class plays a great role in performance ofstudents. Children from more stable families tend to perform betterin academic because of the added advantage of conducive environment.

Article2:

Light,D.W. (1966). Social participation in public and Catholic schools.Reviewof religious research,8(1), 3-11.

SocialParticipation in Public and Catholic Schoolslooks at the atmosphere of public and catholic schools and how itaffects the life of students. This is in respect to the ideologiesthat school atmosphere impacts on the socialization process ofchildren greatly. Schools coupled with family backgrounds have agreater capacity to influence the lives of children either negativelyorpositively. The authors recognize that school environment has adirect impact on academic prowess, which consequently affects one’ssocial life to a greater extent.

Theresearch used questionnaires administered to protestant and catholichouseholds whereby the children were asked to describe how they feltin schools. It was noted that children from strict catholic familieswere less active in public schools as compared to permissivefamilies. Academic performance was highly attributed to permissiveenvironment because of the perceived high esteem culminating fromsocial participation. The study noted that a student from a strictcatholic background is more likely to feel at ease in a catholicschool as opposed to a public school. This means that a catholicschool is likely to mould a catholic child as well as a child fromother permissive background. Only 55 percent of catholic childrenwere able to effectively cope in social context in public schools,and 65.7 percent claimed to be active in catholic schools.

Thearticle is a good source of information. It shows the audience thatthe religious backgrounds of children influence their socialparticipation in schools. Those from catholic backgrounds find iteasier to participate in social activities when they attend catholicschools as opposed to public schools. Of essence, catholic schoolsprovide a more conducive environment for children from catholicbackgrounds. Those from permissive backgrounds seem to cope in allschools especially in public ones.

Article3

Sander,W. (1996). Catholic grade schools and academic achievement. Thejournal of human resources,31(3), 540-548.

Inresponse to the controversy on the performance of private schools andpublic schools performance, CatholicGrade Schools and Academic Achievementarticle aims at offering the answer to the same. It is claimed thatcatholic schools perform better than public schools in academicachievement. Many people claim that this difference is due to theselection process as opposed to causation.

Fromthe research, it is apparent that 8 years of catholic education leadsto greater achievements in vocabulary, mathematics, and reading.However, there is no notable difference in sciences. Both Catholicsand non Catholics in these schools contribute greatly to the grades.This means that the background has no effect rather, it is theschool that has the effect.

Thearticle serves as a good source of comparing academic achievement incatholic and public schools. However, it does not explicitly explainthe reasons behind the high grade in catholic schools. The claim thatthe selection process does not contribute to academic prowess inthese schools has not been addressed as introduced in the paper. Inaddition, saying that removing non Catholics from the picture haszero effects does not also offer the solution that the audience islooking for thus, leaves more questions than answers. All in all, itis indisputable that catholic schools tend to perform better thanpublic schools as confirmed from the data in this article.

References

Light,D.W. (1966). Social participation in public and Catholic schools.Reviewof religious research,8(1), 3-11.

MorrisonJ.L. &amp Hodgkina, B. J. (1971). The effectiveness of Catholiceducation: A comparative analysis. Sociologyof education, 44(1), 119-131.

Sander,W. (1996). Catholic grade schools and academic achievement. Thejournal of human resources,31(3), 540-548.