Household Energy Demand

HouseholdEnergy Demand

  1. Household Energy Demand

KITCHEN

Number of units

Number of hours of use per day

Power demand (Watts)

Daily energy demand (Watt-hours)

Individual Annual Electricity demand (kWh)

Coffee-Maker

2

0.5

940

940

172

Kettle

2

0.25

1238

619

113

60 W light bulb

15

6

60

5400

131

14 W compact fluorescent bulb

10

6

14

840

31

Microwave Oven

1

1

1100

1100

402

Electric Range (Stove)

1

0.6

4950

2970

1084

Refrigerator (Over 10 years)

2

8

206

3296

602

Refrigerator (Under 10 years)

1

8

124

992

362

Toaster (2 slice)

1

0.25

920

230

84

Dishwasher (excl hot water)

1

1

1188

1188

434

Blender

1

1

200

200

73

Oven

1

1

1485

1485

542

4 foot fluorescent lighting

2

6

98

1176

215

BATHROOM

60 W light bulb

2

2

60

240

44

4 W compact fluorescent bulb

5

2

14

140

10

Bathroom Ventilation Fan

1

2

72

144

53

Electric Razor

1

0.1

15

1.5

1

BEDROOM, LIVING ROOM

60 W light bulb

6

2

60

720

44

14 W compact fluorescent bulb

4

2

14

112

10

Iron (hand)

2

2

1188

4752

867

Portable Radio

1

5

50

250

91

Television (26&quot)

2

5

327

3270

597

Desktop computer &amp monitor

2

2

248

992

181

Laptop computer

3

5

120

1800

219

Stereo

2

2

98

392

72

MAJOR HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES

Clothes Dryer

4

3

3450

41400

3778

Clothes Washer

2

2

373

1492

272

Water Heater (1 person)

1

0.3

6015

1804.5

659

Furnace (Fan – 1/4 hp.)

1

0.5

347

173.5

63

Vacuum Cleaner (portable)

2

0.7

327

457.8

84

Hot Water Furnace &amp Pump

1

0.1

470

47

17

Oil Furnace Burner

1

0.05

257

12.85

5

Air Conditioner (6000 BTU/hr)

1

0.5

743

371.5

136

&nbsp

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&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

Total daily energy demand (Watt):

&nbsp

79,008.65

&nbsp

Daily energy demand (kWh)

&nbsp

79.00865

&nbsp

Annual Energy Demand (kWh)

&nbsp

28,838.16

&nbsp

Total Annual Energy Demand (Mega Joules)

&nbsp

103,817.4

&nbsp

2.Amount of fuel consumed to generate this electricity usingnon-renewable sources of energy

FUEL CONSUMPTION WORKSHEET

Individual annual electricity demand (MJ)

103,817.40

Liquid or Solid fuel (generation method)

energy density (MJ/kg)

Energy density adjusted for efficiency (MJ/kg)

fuel required (kg)

Diesel (steam driven)

45.6

0.35

15.96

6504.85

Heavy fuel oil (steam-driven)

43.02

0.35

15.057

6894.96

Black coal (steam driven)

24

0.35

8.4

12359.2

Uranium oxide (U3O8) (CANDU)

470000

0.3

141000

0.73629

Gaseous fuel (generation method)

energy density (MJ/m^3)

efficiency of generation

Energy density adjusted for efficiency (MJ/m^3)

fuel required (m^3)

Natural gas (steam driven)

39

0.35

13.65

7605.67

Natural gas (combined cycle)

39

0.55

21.45

4839.97

3.Greenhouse gas emissions for each fuel type and generation method

Diesel

Gas emitted

emission factor (g/kg)

emission (g) (emission factor x fuel required)

CO2 equivalent factor

CO2 eq (g)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

CO2

3098.55

20155601.8

1

20155601.8

CH4

0.15

975.727444

23

22441.7312

N2O

0.45

2927.18233

317

927916.799

Total CO2 eq (g)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

21105960.3

Total CO2 eq (tonnes)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

21.1059603

Heavy Fuel Oil

Gas emitted

emission factor (g/kg)

emission (g)

CO2 equivalent factor

CO2 eq (g)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

CO2

3584.4

24714291.6

1

24714291.6

CH4

0.04

275.798366

23

6343.36242

N2O

0.07

482.647141

317

152999.144

Total CO2 eq (g)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

24873634.1

Total CO2 eq (tonnes)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

24.8736341

Black coal (steam driven)

Gas emitted

emission factor (g/kg)

emission (g)

CO2 equivalent factor

CO2 eq (g)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

CO2

2249

27795872.9

1

27795872.9

CH4

0.02

247.184286

23

5685.23857

N2O

0.03

370.776429

317

117536.128

Total CO2 eq (g)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

27919094.3

Total CO2 eq (tonnes)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

27.9190943

Natural gas (steam driven)

Gas emitted

emission factor (g/kg)

emission (g)

CO2 equivalent factor

CO2 eq (g)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

CO2

1891

14382322.6

1

14382322.6

CH4

0.49

3726.77846

23

85715.9046

N2O

0.05

380.283516

317

120549.875

Total CO2 eq (g)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

14588588.4

Total CO2 eq (tonnes)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

14.5885884

Natural gas (combined cycle)

Gas emitted

emission factor (g/kg)

emission (g)

CO2 equivalent factor

CO2 eq (g)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

CO2

1891

9152387.1

1

9152387.1

CH4

0.49

2371.58629

23

54546.4848

N2O

0.05

241.998601

317

76713.5566

Total CO2 eq (g)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

9283647.15

Total CO2 eq (tonnes)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

9.28364715

Uranium oxide (U3O8) (CANDU)

Gas emitted

emission factor (g/kg)

emission (g)

CO2 equivalent factor

CO2 eq (g)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

CO2

0

0

1

0

CH4

0

0

23

0

N2O

0

0

317

0

Total CO2 eq (g)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

0

Total CO2 eq (tonnes)

&nbsp

&nbsp

&nbsp

0

4.Reviewof Who Killed the Electric Car

‘Whokilled the electric car is a documentary film that was shot in 2006.The movie expounds on creation and limited commercialization, as wellas subsequent destruction of battery electric vehicle in US. Thevehicle was invented in mid-1990s by General Motors EV1. The movieseemed to explore the role played by automobile manufacturers, USgovernment, California government, batteries, hydrogen vehicles andthe oil industry.

Themost intriguing thing in this movie is the suspect-verdict scenariosportrayed in quest for the factors that contributed to the end ofelectric cars. These are:

  1. Suspect 1: Poor Battery Technology, Verdict 1: Not Guilty

  2. Suspect 2: Oil Companies, Verdict 2: Guilty

  3. Suspect 3: Car Companies, Verdict 3: Guilty

  4. Suspect 4: Government, Verdict 4: Guilty

  5. Suspect 5: CARB, Verdict 5: Guilty

  6. Suspect 6: Consumers, Verdict 6: Guilty

  7. Suspect 7: Hydrogen Fuel Cell, Verdict 7: Guilty.

Despitethe 1990s EVs being killed off, at the end of the film, it can beseen that the current environment is promising for brighter futurefor the hybrid and electric cars. It was clear that the higher oilprices coupled with increasing threats of global warming had beenincreasing the pressure to reduce overdependence on oil in UnitedStates. According to the movie, it is clear that wind and solarenergy are vital in reducing carbon pollution for switch EVs.

References

Culley,M. R., Adam D., Scott R. and Jalika C. (2011). Sun, Wind, Rock andMetal: Attitudes toward Renewable and Non-renewable Energy Sources inthe Context of Climate Change and Current Energy Debates. CurrentPsychology30 (3), 215-33.

Showstack,R. (2012). Greenhouse Gas Emissions Tool. Eos,Transactions American Geophysical Union93 (4), 44.

Toth,F. L. (2012). Energyfor Development: Resources, Technologies, Environment.Dordrecht: Springer.