Marketing Strategy of Overweight kids

MARKETING STRATEGY OF OVERWEIGHT KIDS 8

MarketingStrategy of Overweight kids

MarketingStrategy of Overweight kids

Background

Canadais an examplethat has a challengeof theepidemicof obesity andoverweight. TheCanadian citiesof Alberta, Ontario, andSaskatchewan havea significantly highnumberof obeseoroverweight childrenthan thenations’averagefortheadultpopulation(Ogden, et al., 2011). In Ontario, childhoodobesity is tremendouslyincreasingandhas causedsignificanthealthproblemsto thekids.Childhoodobesity can leadto lifetimediseasesandaffectthewellbeing of theaffectedindividuals,increasingthedemandforthehealthcarefrom thepublic.Majorityof theaffectedchildrencomefrom poorfamiliesdue to lackof enoughresourcesto buyqualityandbalanceddiet.Theprimaryfactorthat has ledto poorhealthis inadequateaccessto recommendeddietandchildrenare themainvictimsof theseproblems.Althoughtheparentshavegiventhehealthof their childrena toppriority,itremainsto be a challenge.Theparentsexpectthegovernment,media,andbusinessprofessionalsto supportthem in their effortsto raisinghealthyfamilies.In Ontario, there is a highmarketdemandforfoodfattyfoodproductsthat businesssetupsshould maximize on to be competitiveenoughin themarket.

Statisticsshowsthata thirdof Canadians in Ontario aged17 andbeloware obeseoroverweight. EveniftheCanadian authoritieshavetriedtheir bestto controltheproblem,itis stillprevalent(Janssen, 2013). WorldHealth Organization indicatesthat31.5 per centof childrenagedbetween five andseventeen years,an estimatednumberof 1.6 million wereclassifiedas beingobeseoroverweight in 2011. Thestatistics showthatamong thechildrenbetween theagesof five to eleven, thepercentagenumberof affectedboyswasmorethan doublethenumberof girls(Roberts, et al., 2012). Thenumberof overweight childrenhas beenincreasingin Canada over theyears.Forinstance,from 1978 to 2007, thenumberincreasedfrom 15% to 29%. Theaffectedchildrencontinueto gainexcess weightevenafter theageof 18 (Tremblay, Gorber, &amp Janssen, 2012). Ifthetrendscontinue,thenby 2040, theaffectednumberof childrenis estimatedto increaseup to 70%. Thetrendwill alsoaffecta largenumberof adultsabove 40 years.Individualswhoare obesehavea riskof sufferingfrom strokes,heartdisease,diabetes orcancer(Tarride, et al., 2012). Childhoodobesity is a challengeto thegovernmentof Canada as theaffectedpopulationmust be takencareof by thegovernment.Costsof treatmentof obesity conditionsare high,andthegovernmentmust allocateenoughresourcesto ensurethatits populaceis healthy.

Parentsalwayswishto havehealthychildrenwhoare happyandreadyto succeedin their dailyactivities.However,thechallengeof obesity underminestheir efforts.Theproblemaffectsthemajorityof childrenin Ontario, andthegovernmentof Canada must devise appropriatemeansto ensurethatitissolved.Thetypesof foodsthat are consumedby householdsare one of theleadingcausesof childhoodobesity, besides theproblemof poverty.Businessenterprises that specializein theproductionof fastfoodshavecontributedto theproblem.Theysellfattyfoodsthat are not cholesterol free,affectingtheconsumersdirectly.Thekindof lifestyle thatkidsare subjectedto alsocontributesto theproblem(Janssen, Shields, Craig, &amp Tremblay, 2011). Theyareonlyinvolvedin indoor activitiesandwatchingmoviesandvideo games.Theydon’thaveenoughtimeto gooutandplaygamesin orderto eliminatesomeof thecalories that theyconsumedaily.Theneteffectof thisproblemis a continuousincreasein thenumberof affectedkidswith theproblemof obesity.

Thegovernment’smedicaldepartmentmust worktogetherwith theparentsandthefoodindustryto lookfora bestsolutionto theproblem.Iftheauthoritiescannot respondin time,thenchildrenwill developchronicdiseasesat a youngage,andtheconditioncan developas theyage.Thecoststhat areassociatedwith treatingobesity patientswill be high,andtheneteffectwill be divertingdevelopmentresourcesto their treatment.Everyindividualin thesocietyshould takea balanceddietandensurethattheyhaveavoidedtheconsumptionof fattymeals.It’salmostimpossibleforindividualsto be activeenoughto theextentof burningoff theextracalories that theyconsume.Parentsshould, therefore,ensurethatkidshaveconsumedmealsthat are cholesterol freeandare physicallyactiveas a measureof stayinghealthy(Tran, et al., 2013). Themainbeneficiariesof thispracticeare thebusinessunitsthat dealwith sellingthefoodproducts.Theyhaveappropriatemarketingandtradestrategiesthat enablethem to markettheir productsto thehouseholds.

Targetmarket

TargetMarketing dealswith identifyingandattractingcustomersthat will buyEnterprises products.Foran organizationto marketits productseffectively,ithas to domarketingresearch.Theresearchwill enabletheorganizationto knowwhopurchasestheproductsandhowto reachthem. Themarketconstitutesa groupof customersthata businessdecidesto focusits marketingeffortsto ensurethatithas soldits products.Thekidsandparentsof Ontario constitutethetargetmarketas theyare themostaffectedgroupof childhoodobesity (Tompson, &amp Kennedy, 2013). Parentsshould lookforappropriatemechanismsforensuringthattheir kidsconsumea balanceddietandaresubjectedto physicalexercises.However,thegovernmentshould provideenoughsupportandadviceto thecitizensof Ontario in ensuringthattheyarenot subjectedto foodsthat are not cholesterol free.Theindividualsshould alsobesensitizedto theimportanceof avoidingfattymealsandbeingphysicallyactive.Theproblemof obesity andoverweight affectsnot onlythevictims’families,butalsothegovernment.Enterprisesthat dealwith foodproductsshould concentratetheir effortson familiesthat havekids.Theyshould understandtheneedsandwantsof everyindividualforthem to controlthemarket.Smallbusinesssettingsbenefitfrom thisstrategyas focusingon a singlesegmentenablesthem to competeeffectivelyagainst establishedfirms (Thorson, &amp Moore, 2013). Theprimaryadvantageof targetmarketingis thefactthatthosewhoaretargetedshowan intenseloyaltytowards a particularbrand.In Ontario, kidsare themainconsumersof foodsubstancesthat leadto overweight conditionsanditis importantforbusinesssetups to focustheir marketingstrategieson them. Targetmarketingis thebeststrategythatbusinesssetups in Ontario can useto gaina competitiveadvantagein themarket.

BeyondConventional Outsourcing Solution (BCOS) model

Innovationbeyond conventionaloutsourcing solutionmodeloffersclientsa chanceto engagewith thebusinessorganizations.Themodelcombinesthebestpracticesof a businesssettingto ensurethatithas gaineda competitiveadvantagein themarket.Businesssetupsin Ontario can benefitfrom theapplicationof thismodelbecauseitcoversall thepositiveattributesthat areassociatedwith marketing.Tha strategygivesthecustomersa chanceof buyingtheproductsat a reducedprice.Themodelalsoofferstheconvenienceof thebuyingprocessbecauseitincorporateselectronictechnology in purchasingtheproducts.

Technologicalinnovationsof themodelcan be usedto solvesomeof thecomplexchallengesthat fastfoodfirms have,helpingthem to reducerisksthat arerelatedto closureandin thelong-run, theygaina competitiveadvantagein themarket.Parentsalwayspreferconveniencein thebuyingprocessandwill alwaysopt to purchasethefoodproductsfrom firms that usetheBCOS model.Businesssetupsin Ontario can outsource thistypeof technology andbenefitfrom its broadrangeof advantages.Themodelnot onlyimprovestheefficacyandefficiencyof thecompaniesof Ontario butalsoactsas a standardplatformthat can be usedto carryout their businessin an e-way. Themodelofferscustomersatisfactionin thebuyingprocessandin termsof ensuringthattheproductshavebeenpurchasedat a reducedcost(Al-Tayyar, 2014). Thebusinesssetupsshould not onlyfocuson costreduction,butalsoensurethattheir customershavebeensatisfiedwith theservicethat isofferedto them by thebusinessunits.Thebusinessunitsshould understandthatan unsatisfied customercan tarnishthereputationof thecompany,anditis necessaryto maintaingoodcustomerrelationswith them.

References

Ogden,C. L., Gorber, S. C., Dommarco, J. A. R., Carroll, M., Shields, M., &ampFlegal, K. (2011). Theepidemiology of childhood obesity in Canada, Mexico, and the UnitedStates.In Epidemiologyof Obesity in Children and Adolescents(pp. 69-93). Springer New York.

Janssen,I. (2013). Thepublic health burden of obesity in Canada.Canadianjournal of diabetes,37(2),90-96.

Roberts,K. C., Shields, M., de Groh, M., Aziz, A., &amp Gilbert, J. A.(2012). Overweightand obesity in children and adolescents: results fromthe 2009 to 2011 Canadian Health Measures Survey. HealthRep,23(3),37-41.

Tremblay,M. S., Gorber, S. C., &amp Janssen, I. (2012). Measuresof abdominal obesity within body mass index categories, 1981 and2007-2009.Statistics Canada.

Tarride,J. E., Haq, M., Taylor, V. H., Sharma, A. M., Nakhai-Pour, H. R.,O’Reilly, D., &amp Goeree, R. (2012). Healthstatus, hospitalizations, day procedures, and physician costsassociated with body mass index (BMI) levels in Ontario, Canada.ClinicoEconomicsand outcomes research: CEOR,4,21.

Janssen,I., Shields, M., Craig, C. L., &amp Tremblay, M. S.(2011). Prevalence and secular changes in abdominal obesity inCanadian adolescents and adults, 1981 to 2007–2009. ObesityReviews,12(6),397-405.

Tran,B. X., Nair, A. V., Kuhle, S., Ohinmaa, A., &amp Veugelers, P. J.(2013). Cost analyzesof obesity in Canada: scope, quality, and implications. CostEff Resour Alloc,11(3).

Tompson,J., &amp Kennedy, S. W. (2013). Whereexactly is the target market? Using geographic information systemsfor locating potential customers of a small business.EntrepreneurialPractice Review,2(4).

Thorson,E., &amp Moore, J. (Eds.). (2013). Integratedcommunication: Synergy of persuasive voices.Psychology Press.

Al-Tayyar,M. H. (2014). Corporateentrepreneurship and new business development: analysis oforganizational frameworks, systematic processes and entrepreneurialattributes in established organizations(Doctoral dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology).