The Impact of Downsizing on Families

THE IMPACT OF DOWNSIZING ON FAMILIES 6

TheImpact of Downsizing on Families

TheImpact of Downsizing on Families

Downsizing,or rather, the reduction of the magnitude and size of a businessentity via eliminating workers and divisions in a company ofteninvites heated debates particularly with regard to its effects. Moreoften than not, it is often aimed at enhancing the productivity,profitability and sustainability of the business entity throughelimination of unnecessary expenses or costs. However, the samecannot be said of employees particularly the ones that are eventuallycut off the list of workers. While this may be the case, there arecertain beneficial ways in which downsizing would affect thefamilies.

First,downsizing may actually result in an increase in the incomes ofindividuals. As noted, some workers may be eliminated and their jobsheaped to those of other workers. In essence, some workers would havean increase in responsibilities and tasks, which often comes with anincrease in income. An increase in the income of individuals meansthat the families would have an improved or enhanced lifestyle in thelong-term as they would have more disposable income and have thecapacity to acquire more or pay for more.

Inaddition, downsizing would mean that the individuals who have beeneliminated from the workforce would have much more time for theirfamilies. More often than not, the increased responsibilities in theworkplace result in a decrease in the number of hours that anindividual spends with the familyi.This is actually touted as one of the major reasons for the breakingof homesii.In essence, downsizing would mean that the retrenched employees wouldhave more time for their families and to take care of the things thatreally matter to them. This is bound to result in more stability intheir familiesiii.Of course, they can use this time to explore some new areas, do sometravelling without being overly concerned about responsibilities oreven having their bosses over their necks.

Onthe same note, downsizing presents individuals with an opportunity toexplore other areas of their liking. More often than not, individualsstick to a particular job even when they do not like it. This may beone of the most unfulfilling elements of life as it ensures that theydo not live the lives of their dream and never pursue the things thatreally matter to themiv.Once they are released or rather relieved of their duty, there isabsolutely no reason why they cannot go ahead and pursue the thingsthat really matter to them and, of course, make some money fromthemv.

Whilethis may be the case, it would be difficult to enjoy all thesewithout the joy that comes with being engaged in a particular job.Indeed, it is noteworthy that spending time with the family comes asmore exciting in instances where the individuals have not beenspending too much time together. The old adage that “familiaritybreed contempt” always applies in families, in which case workeliminates the familiarity and allows for an element of “renewal”when time is set aside for familyvi.It is understandable that there would be nothing special with familytime if every day is dedicated to it.

Inaddition, examining other areas or running after their dreams may bea feasible silver lining in losing a particular job. However, it isnoted that not only individuals that dislike their jobs would beeliminated but also some who actually do like them. On the same note,such sackings or retrenchments are often carried out in a sudden andabrupt manner, in which case individuals would not have time to laydown their plans and strategize on the most appropriate and feasibleway of pursuing their dreamsvii.Such plans would also involve looking for sufficient amounts offinances that would allow them to not only finance their dreams butalso cater for their families before the dreams start paying off. Inessence, there is a high chance that pursuing dreams would bedifficult without the financial backing that comes with a job.

Inconclusion, downsizing often comes with positive effects to thecompany but negative ones to the employees particularly when they areretrenched. As much as it may be thought that the individuals thatare sacked would have more time for their families or to exploreother avenues of investment and do some travelling, it is noted thatsuch retrenchment may disorient an individual from their path as faras pursuit of their dreams and provide too much time to them, makingfamily time unenjoyable.

Bibliography

RonaldJ. Burke, and Cary L. Cooper, TheOrganization in Crisis: Downsizing, Restructuring, and Privatization(Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 2000), [46-63]

DavidMacCormick, TheDownsized Warrior: America`s Army in Transition(New York, NY: New York: University Press, 1998), [23-37].

ZeinabA. Karake, OrganizationalDownsizing, Discrimination, and Corporate Social Responsibility(Westport, Conn: Quorum Books, 1999), [34-56].

CharlesR. Greer, StrategicHuman Resource Management: General Managerial Approach, 2nded. New York Pearson Education, 2004), [37-76].

CaryL. Cooper, Alankrita Pandey, and James C. Quick. Downsizing:Is Less Still More?(NewYork: Cambridge University Press, 2012), [42-52].

Endnotes

i Ronald J. Burke, and Cary L. Cooper, The Organization in Crisis: Downsizing, Restructuring, and Privatization (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 2000), [46-63]

ii David MacCormick, The Downsized Warrior: America`s Army in Transition (New York, NY: New York: University Press, 1998), [23-37].

iii David MacCormick, The Downsized Warrior: America`s Army in Transition (New York, NY: New York: University Press, 1998), [23-37].

iv Charles R. Greer, Strategic Human Resource Management: General Managerial Approach, 2nd ed. New York Pearson Education, 2004), [37-76].

v Ronald J. Burke, and Cary L. Cooper, The Organization in Crisis: Downsizing, Restructuring, and Privatization (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 2000), [46-63]

vi Zeinab A. Karake, Organizational Downsizing, Discrimination, and Corporate Social Responsibility (Westport, Conn: Quorum Books, 1999), [34-56].

vii Cary L. Cooper, Alankrita Pandey, and James C. Quick. Downsizing: Is Less Still More? (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012), [42-52].