White Collar Criminals vs. Street Robbers

WhiteCollar Criminals vs. Street Robbers

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WhiteCollar Criminals vs. Street Robbers

Thequestion whether High Ranking Corporate Officers (CEO’s) who commitwhite-collar crimes should be treated less harshly than thugs in thestreet is a question, which raises mixed feeling among people. According to Schmalleger(2012), crimes should not be treated the same since they are ofvarying nature and are committed in different ways. In this regards,white-collar criminals should receive a harsh sentence than robbersor street criminals. White-collar crimes are mainly committed usingup to date technology or a consistent and planned action. In suchcrimes, not so many people are put at risk such as loss of lives ofpeople who should not have died, as is the case with street robberyor breaking into houses. CEO’s use their brains to steal in a smartway in such as a way that they do not affect so many parties in theprocess. On the other hand, street robbers or thugs mainly use forceand violence and end up violating human rights and affecting so manyparties in the process.

Accordingto Shahidullah (2008), some crimes are seen morally morereprehensible than others are. Crimes, which affect so many peopleresulting in injuries loss of life, rape among others, are consideredhighly reprehensible. In particular, crimes, which violate humanrights, are considered very wrong and hence harsh punishments shouldbe given to ensure justice. On the other hand, crimes such aswhite-collar crimes rarely result into inhuman acts such as loss oflife, rape, injuries and hence considered less reprehensible. Inthird world countries, many white collar criminals are given a fewyear sentence and later offered jobs such fraud detectors, auditors,intelligence personnel to utilize their intelligence and skills.

References

Schmalleger,F. (2012).Criminologytoday: An integrative introduction (6thed.).Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall

Shahidullah,S.M. (2008). CrimePolicy in America: Laws, Institutions, and Programs. UniversityPress of AmericaAmazon.com